How the Hated Donald Trump Came to Power

The most volatile and divisive election in recent American history has just passed and against all odds the hated businessman Donald Trump was able to overcome the former First Lady in the race to the White House. Watching the news or reading social media would suggest that the end is neigh. To many it seems that the only event worse than this would be for Jesus to descend to Earth once more only to resurrect Hitler and go on a jolly Old Testament style genocide.

I am certainly no Trump supporter, though neither did I support Hillary, but then I am from the UK so that is somewhat irrelevant. Trump is a multi-millionaire with a detestable personality and no real clue about how the working man lives. He constantly contradicted himself and said some pretty bad things that should make anyone stop and think. The media saw him as a joke and he drew ire from both parties and the world at large. So how did he manage to win so comfortably?  Continue reading

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Party Politics Offer no Positives to the People.

Democracy began with the Greeks when the public would gather to cast votes on decisions that effected their community. This became impractical as the public continued to grow and the number of decisions that needed to be made constantly increased. Representatives of the people were then chosen to discuss and make these decisions in the name of those that they represented. This became the model of our modern day Western democracy and has been in place for centuries. These representatives gathered together under loose ideologies until we found ourselves voting for parties that matched our own rough political alignment more than a specific individual that would best represent our needs.

Within this same period society has changed drastically. From the jobs that we work, the roles that we conform to and the time and distance we can communicate, every facet of who we are and how we act as a community is new and different. The internet has allowed cultures and idea to mix at a far faster rate than when people were restricted to their local villages and towns. We can travel the world to experience other societies in a matter of hours and have a constant barrage of video on our TVs and phones. We are more aware of what is going on, more conscious of what our politicians are doing and as such can apply more scrutiny to their actions. Continue reading